KASIKIDNUMCHAI BHUMINAN
Victoria School
0
2020
Self-Portrait
Charcoal on Paper
60 x 50 cm

Art was confined to a maximum of 30cm by 42cm, pencil, coloured pencil, crayon and/or paint on paper, maybe canvas board if one was lucky. All done in one seating. But here, students were not just introduced to drawing with charcoal on paper. They were also challenged to first, take photographs of themselves. Then they were challenged to, albeit with the help of grid lines, draw themselves upside down on large papers over a duration of a few weeks. Many times, the students felt like giving up. Eventually, they gained more than their very first painstakingly completed masterpieces. They were equipped with the courage to take on future unknowns, try new art materials and approaches, and to begin working amidst uncertainties. Stumbles and mistakes are inevitable. So is success for those who persevered.

 

0
2020
Fruit Painting
Acrylic on canvas board
61 x 90 cm

Nature is the master artist and teacher for student painters to learn about colour and painting. Therefore, a closeup study of its wisdom would yield a student painter tremendous learnings. In this set of acrylic on canvas board fruit paintings, six students took up the challenge of large scale painting with acrylic paint to understand the effects of colours when placed side by side and rendered with brushstrokes of various qualities. Observations of colours “jumping out” or “sinking into” the perceived surfaces may be gainfully used for future art making.

Secondary 2
Self-Portrait 2020 Charcoal on Paper 60 x 50 cm

Art was confined to a maximum of 30cm by 42cm, pencil, coloured pencil, crayon and/or paint on paper, maybe canvas board if one was lucky. All done in one seating. But here, students were not just introduced to drawing with charcoal on paper. They were also challenged to first, take photographs of themselves. Then they were challenged to, albeit with the help of grid lines, draw themselves upside down on large papers over a duration of a few weeks. Many times, the students felt like giving up. Eventually, they gained more than their very first painstakingly completed masterpieces. They were equipped with the courage to take on future unknowns, try new art materials and approaches, and to begin working amidst uncertainties. Stumbles and mistakes are inevitable. So is success for those who persevered.